Researchers have developed a better tomato species by transformation

Tomatoes are already known to be a good model species for research in plants, but researchers have made it more easier by cutting the time required to modify their genes by six weeks.

BTI Assistant Professor Joyce Van Eck and former postdoctoral scientist Sarika Gupta have developed a better way of “transforming” a tomato where the process involves insertion of DNA into the tomato genome and growing it into a new plant. Auxin which is a growth hormone is added to the medium that helps to speed up the growth of tomato cells, which will eventually help accelerating the speed of their research.They have described this advancement in a study which was published in Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture.

Usually transformation is a process where a soil bacterium known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens is inserted into a new segment of DNA inside the cells of tomato seedling tissues. The transformed cells are transplanted into the plant regeneration medium, that contains hormones and nutrients which causes the tissue to grow into a tiny new plants. These plantlets are then transferred to root induction medium where root will grow and finally planted in soil and hardened in the greenhouse. In this new process, the researchers have added auxin to the regeneration and rooting media. The addition reduces the length of the procedure from 17 weeks to just 11.

Van Eck said that”If you can speed up the plant development, which is what the auxin is doing, you can decrease the time it takes to get genetically engineered lines”.

The scientists have performed the transformation of tomato routinely, as a study method to understand how individual genes affect tomato growth and development. Their new protocol does not only saves time, but uses fewer materials, and saves money. The researchers can finish the experiments sooner and potentially run more projects at once.

This project came out of a collaboration with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory which helps to identify gene pathways that could be used to breed crops with higher yields.

“We’re looking at the genes and gene networks involved in stem cell proliferation, meristem development and flowering and branching with the end goal being that maybe genes that we identify in tomato, which is strictly being used as a model, might help us understand what can be done to increase yield in other crops.” said Vank Eck

Leave a Reply

Related Articles

10 common food that you probably did not know was a GMO GMO or Genetically Modified Organism are the plants and animals whose genetic material (DNA) has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally b...
10 things that you probably did not know about biohacking Bio-hacking is a term which refers to the application of IT hacks to biological systems, mostly the human body - but it also includes the entire biosp...
10 Weird Lesser-Known Genetics Facts That Will Amaze You With the great discoveries of the 20th century was that of the role of DNA in heritability and the maintenance of life. Each of our cells contains alm...
13 peculiar genetically modified organism you probably did not know Glittering seahorse and cabbages with venom in it? Seemed like some far fetched dream until scientist came up with GMOS! so what is a GMO? A GMO, or g...
8 superhuman abilities that are caused by mutation A genetic mutation is a permanent alteration in the DNA sequence that makes up a gene, such that the sequence differs from what is found in most peopl...
A Brief Outlook on Bioterrorism and Emergency Prepardness  Bio terrorism, the word itself describes terror. It is considered as worse weapon of the century.The 2001 Anthrax attacks which occurred in United st...
Dark DNA will make you question about your concept of evolution Ever wondered how giraffe got its huge neck or why snakes are so long. DNA sequencing technology has helped scientists to solve questions that humans ...