This startup is using sea-water green house to end food crisis

Climate change, along with the increasing world populations and unsustainable farming practices, is causing scarcity of food resources and freshwater. This also caused the depletion of groundwater. These are the few reasons how the idea Seawater Greenhouse was generated.

Seawater Greenhouse uses a new source of fresh water, which is derived from seawater, and a suitable climate for growing the plants can be managed. The Seawater Greenhouse helps in providing a low-cost solution that allows enabling year-round crop production in some of the world’s driest and hottest regions. It uses sunlight and seawater. This technology copies the natural process and helps to restore the environment while reducing the operating costs of greenhouse horticulture.

Evaporators help in creating a climate that enables crops to grow in areas that generally don’t and also provide the right conditions due to lack of freshwater or high temperature. Only the pure water evaporates, and the seawater is then reduced to concentrated brine, which can be evaporated outside the greenhouse to yield salt and other minerals. Evaporating seawater and cooling the air in the process is much simpler and cheaper than desalination. By this method, the plants are not stressed by excessive transpiration and tend to grow faster and produce higher yields.

Evaporating seawater and cooling the air in the process is much simpler and cheaper than desalination. By this method, the plants are not stressed by excessive transpiration and tend to grow faster and produce a higher yield.

The team has a variety of experts whose main aim is to provide a better solution for the production of freshwater for growth and sustainability of plants

The Seawater Greenhouse makes proper use of natural resources like sun, water, and degraded land and helps in producing freshwater, high-quality crops, and a restored landscape.

This concept originated in 1991 and developed by Light Works Ltd in the United Kingdom. The initial pilot research project commenced in 1992 on the Canary Island of Tenerife, and the positive results confirmed its viability and the potential for other arid regions.

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